Training Plans


In 2013, I took a course to become an RRCA-certified running coach. I wasn't really sure if I'd ever take on running clients, but I really wanted that credential to back me up when I write on my blog about running. I am very confident about training and the advice that I give, but confidence doesn't mean much if you don't have a credential to prove it ;)


I've written numerous plans for friends and family, but haven't taken on running clients (yet--I may in the future). However, I thought it would be fun to include some plans here for people to enjoy. I will add to this page as I write more training plans, and I welcome feedback (positive or negative) regarding the plans. I'd love to help people reach their running goals! And this a great way for me to do that.

A few notes about my style of training:

*I follow the 80/20 ratio of easy running to moderate or hard running. Numerous studies and examples have shown that this is the ideal formula for reaching our best potential as runners. I recommend Matt Fitzgerald's book, 80/20 Running, to explain why this formula works so well. (Make sure you get the print edition, because the training plans require a ton of flipping back and forth through the pages, which would be very difficult with a digital copy.)

*I love heart rate training (namely for easy runs) and I highly recommend using a heart rate monitor to keep your easy runs truly EASY.

*I believe that rest days are necessary, so none of my plans will involve training every single day.

*I write most plans in terms of time, rather than distance. There are a couple of reasons for this: 1) You won't rush through your easy runs in order to get through them faster--if you're scheduled for 30 minutes, then you'll run 30 minutes regardless of pace; and 2) The 80/20 ratio of easy to hard running is meant for time spent running, not distance.

Finally, my favorite group of people to help train are the middle- or back-of-the-pack runners. I can certainly help train highly competitive people, but these plans that I write will focus mostly on the middle of the pack. If you have an idea of a plan you'd like me to create, feel free to leave a suggestion, and I may consider it in the future!

(Please remember to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise program. These plans are not individualized, so they don't take your personal health into consideration. Use my advice at your own risk.)




    

    

    

    

 


Here are some posts I've written with general training advice that may be helpful as well:

The importance of the easy run (a must read!!)
A guide to running lingo (common terms used in running)
50 Running Tips (everything from clothes and weather to safety and beating boredom)
Tips for running (and training for) your first 5K race
Tips for running (and training for) your first 10K race
Tips for running (and training for) your first half-marathon
Tips for running (and training for) your first full marathon